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Harriet Tubman Elementary School - 2013 General Meyer Ave. Recovery School District, owner; Mahlum/Scairono Martinez, architect; Jacobs/CSRS, project manager; Construction Masters, Inc., contractor Originally named for banker Adolph Meyer, Harriet Tubman Elementary School was built in 1917 as part of the present complex, which includes a Craftsman-style shotgun caretaker’s cottage. Designed in the popular Craftsman style by school board architect E.A. Christy, the school was enlarged with additional wings after 1925. A century later, years of deferred maintenance combined with termite and hurricane damage left the school unusable. In 2018, the Louisiana Recovery School District completed a $17 million renovation, transforming the school with up-to-date tech- nology while retaining much of the school’s early 20th-century character. Hotel Peter & Paul - 2317 Burgundy St. Nathalie Jordi and ASH NYC, owners; studioWTA, architect; Palmisano, general contractor; MacRostie Historic Advisors and Rick Fifield, AIA, historic consultants; Robert Lilkendey, acoustical consultant; Pace Group, structural engineer; Frishhertz, electrical engineer; Pontchartrain Mechanical, mechanical engineer Opening recently to the welcoming acclaim of both locals and national press, this ambitious hotel project, spearheaded by owner and Marigny resident Nathalie Jordi, revitalized this historic ecclesiastical complex, which had been abandoned and neglected since 2001. Organized in 1848 for Faubourg Marigny’s many Irish Catholic residents, the Sts. Peter and Paul community consisted of the church, designed in 1862 by architect Henry Howard, school, rectory and convent, all playing integral roles in the religious, educational and social life of its neighborhood. This adaptive reuse focused on creating a sense of a light architectural touch, seamlessly concealing the effort necessary to successfully restore the structures. John McDonogh High School - 2426 Esplanade Ave. Recovery School District, Louisiana Department of Education, owner; VergesRome Architects, APAC, architect; C. Spencer Smith, AIA, architect; CORE Construction, general contractor; Jacobs/CSCR, project manager For more than a century, this turreted Gothic Revival-style red brick school has dom- inated its streetscape. One of the last schools built in New Orleans with money do- nated by philanthropist John McDonogh and a fine example of the eclectic designs of school architect E.A. Christy, the building opened as the Esplanade Girls High School in 1912, to be renamed John McDonogh High School in 1923. After some troubled years, the school closed in 2014. Today, a full renovation has retuned the shine to this landmark, which now houses Bricolage, a charter school serving an ethnically diverse student body of children from pre-kindergarten through fifth grades. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation - 1205 North Rampart St. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, owner; Trapolin-Peer Architects, APC, architect; CDW Services, general contractor; Spackman Mossop Michaels, landscape architect; Hilary S. Irvin, tax credit consultant; Damien Serauskas, mechanical engineer; Creighton Engineer, electrical engineer; Bose Engineering, structural engineer A few years after the Civil War ended, Jules LeBlanc, a French-born Cuban merchant, built these two Italianate-style storehouses, located on an imposing corner location in the Faubourg Tremé. Figuring prominently for decades in the life of the then fashion- able Creole neighborhood, the buildings fell into disrepair in the early 20th century. When the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation acquired the property in the late 1980s, many of its historic elements were gone or altered, and the rear courtyard served as a mechanical yard. Approaching the renovation with sensitivity to its histo- ricity, while acknowledging the needs of the client, the team provided a fully updated headquarters, while maintaining its ambience in the cultural landscape. APRIL 2019 www.prcno.org • PRESERVATION IN PRINT   33